Monday, August 20, 2012

How To Paint Your Kitchen Cabinets Without Losing Your Mind

I am so thrilled that almost everyone has loved my kitchen reveal.  It has been so great to come down the stairs every morning and get to make my iced coffee in such a great space.
I have been fielding a lot of questions about how I did it, and what my cabinet painting technique is.  So today I am not only going to show you how I did it, but I am also going to explain how I was able to get through about 10 days of kitchen "renovation" without losing any functionality or my mind. 
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First up, a few quick "before" shots so you can actually grasp just how many kitchen cabinets I have.  It is a LOT:


1. REMOVE CABINET DOORS
The first thing I did was remove all the doors (don't remove and empty the drawers yet at this point.. ) Stack the doors up and save them for later but leave the drawers in the cabinets!

   I know a lot of people label every door and drawer so they can figure out where they go back.  I didn't bother to do that.  There was enough variation in the sizes of my doors (and the fact my mounting hardware was standard) I knew they would only go back a certain way.
When all was said and done, I had to sand, prime and paint THIRTY NINE door and drawer fronts.  (This doesn't include four in the island I previously stained, or the two I removed to create open shelving.)  

That is a lot!   However, I wasn't even dealing with the doors/drawers at this point.  You can live in a kitchen without door fronts, you have bigger fish to fry right now.   

2.  SAND THE CABINET BOXES
Yes, this is messy, but I still didn't bother to empty my cabinets.  I would rather run my plates through the dishwasher than deal with moving them out and putting them back.  I wanted the kitchen to stay FUNCTIONAL and I wanted all my junk right where it belonged.  

To sand the boxes, I did pull the full drawers out and set them on the counter, but I didn't bother emptying them.  To keep the contents clean you can cover them with a drop cloth, but you still should have access to all your utensils and drawer contents during the first stage of this project.
To sand the boxes I used a small palm sander with 100 grit sandpaper.  For the corners I sanded everything by hand.   

3. CLEAN UP
Yes, it seems strange to have "clean up" in the middle of the process, but the sanding is the only truly messy part of the process.  You want to set up a separate space to sand, prime and paint your doors and drawers, so at this point you can clean up your kitchen of the dust (this is good to so you don't get dust into your fresh paint.)  Also make sure you wipe down your sanded cabinet boxes to get rid of the dust.

Here is my secret tip:
CLOROX/LYSOL WIPES!
Yes! These are the best things ever.  They work as well as TSP and act as a tack cloth all at once.  They also cut the grease and grime, they are disposable and they dry almost instantly.  I swear they should label them "Paint Prep Wipes" and market them!  After sanding, just wipe everything down with a Clorox wipe (I use approximately one wipe per cabinet) and you are ready for the next stage:

4. PRIME YOUR CABINET BOXES
I was going to use Benjamin Moore Regal Select paint (in Pearl finish) which contains primer already, and I was assured by the BM salesman that I didn't need to prime, but I don't care.  Call me old school.. if I was going to do this much work,  I was going to make sure it stood the test of time.    I used Killz Latex primer and a sponge roller.  I did two thin layers (by the time I got all the cabinets done, the starting ones were dry so I could easily go back.)  For the corners or any trim work I did use a good quality brush, but I always went back and got rid of brush marks with the roller.

5. PAINT YOUR CABINET BOXES
 I let the primer dry overnight and painted two coats of Manchester Tan on all the boxes.  Remember I have not removed any contents of the cabinets.. I just pushed everything back on the shelves.  The entire time I am painting, I am still using the kitchen to prepare meals. 
You also may need to deal with little details (like caulking seams) at this point.  The gaps in the cabinets where the crown moulding was attached wasn't noticeable on the oak, but once it was white, it was obvious there was a gap.  A little caulk before the last coat of paint took care of that:
At this point, your kitchen is "good to go."  I honestly rushed through those first stages because I knew once the boxes were done, I could take my time on the rest of it.  If you never got around to painting the doors or drawers, you can still use your kitchen.  That is the key to this painting strategy.

When you are ready to move on (since you may want a break at this point) take the contents of your drawers and set it on your newly cleaned countertops.  This is going to be a slightly more disruptive stage than the others, since you will have to dig through the loose contents of your drawers, but it will go quick I promise.

6. SAND, PRIME, PAINT DRAWERS
This step (exactly the same technique I used on the boxes) went pretty quick, since the drawers have such little surface area.  I set up an area in the garage to do this so my mess was contained.  Once they are painted and dry, return them to the kitchen and fill them back up.  Your project is almost complete!  You just have to live with "Open Concept Cabinetry" for now!

7. SAND, PRIME, PAINT DOORS
I'm not going to sugar coat it.  This is the absolute WORST part of this whole project.  It takes forever, and you will be so sick of looking at doors you will swear off painting forever.  Just hang in there!

The way I dealt with this many doors is to set up an assembly line.  I lined all the doors up on blocks to keep them off the floor. I also set up sawhorses and a bucket to hold the doors and my paint tray up (since I didn't want to have to lean over.. I was going to be there a while)
The order you paint the doors is important too.. I found this worked best:

Prime back of door (twice)
Prime front of door (twice)

Let dry (front side up) overnight

Paint back of door (twice)
Paint front of door (twice)

Let dry (front side up) overnight

The reason this matters is that when you flip the slightly damp doors over, you risk nicking the paint job.  I would rather have the paint on the FRONT of the door to be perfect, so always start with the back side of the doors.   The overnight dry time between flipping helped prevent any sort of chipping/marking. 

Also, don't forget about your hardware at this point.  If you are reusing it you want to make sure you spray paint it at this point. 
I have had a few questions about the cabinet color.  Most people think they are painted white, but that isn't true.  They are TAN.. and pretty dark tan at that.  It doesn't look like it in my dark kitchen, but when you see the difference between the primer and the paint, it is very apparent:
Here the first row is primed (the fronts) and the other row is on the first stage of painting.. you can tell the difference:
Once they are dry, re-attach the hardware and HANG UP THOSE BAD BOYS!!!  

In case you are curious how long it took exactly, the breakdown of the timeline was like this:
Day 1: Remove doors (and hardware)
Day 2: Sand Cabinet Boxes and Clean Up
Day 3: Prime Cabinet Boxes
Day 4: Paint Cabinet Boxes
Days 5-6: Sand, Prime, Paint Drawers
Day 6: Sand Doors and wipe them down
Day 7: Prime Doors
Day 8: Paint Doors
Day 9: Reinstall Doors and Celebrate 
Wwithout doors on the cabinets, I had to stare at this scene for days on end:
I was definitely craving a celebratory margarita when the doors were finally finished!  It was completely worth it!  The kitchen came out great:



.. and I didn't even lose my mind! 

Sharing at some of these parties and more..
*MONDAY*
Tutorial & Tips – Home Stories from A to Z
Craft-O-Maniac Monday- Craftomaniac
DIY Project Parade- The DIY Showoff
Creative Me Monday- The Southern Institute
Keeping It Simple-Motivate Me Monday 
 Serendipity and Spice - Manic Monday
The Girl Creative-Just Something I Whipped Up
Metamophasis Monday- Between Naps on the Front Porch
Mop it Up Monday - I Should Be Mopping the Floor

*TUESDAY*
Today's Creative Blog-Get your Craft On Tuesday 
 Uncommonly Yours- Link Party
Sugar Bee Crafts-Take A Look Tuesday
Show Me What Ya Got- Not Just a Housewife
Tip Me Tuesday- Tip Junkie
Trash 2 Treasure Tuesday- Sassy Sites
Power of Paint - Domestically Speaking
Tuesday Tutorial Link Party- Kurtz Corner
Daunting to Doable- Project Queen  
*WEDNESDAY*
 Wicked Awesome Wednesdays - Handy Man, Crafty Woman
CSI Project Link Up- The CSI Project (Weekly Challenges)
From Dream to Reality: DIY Dreamer
Link It Up Wednesday- Junk In Their Trunk
Someday Crafts- Whatever Goes Wednesday
Show & Share- Southern Lovely
Pin it and Win It - Cheap Crafty Mama

And (Just for the hell of it..)
So I Married A Craft Blogger

86 comments:

  1. You did a marvelous job on a big project here! What an excellent step-by-step guide to painting your kitchen. I love how it turned out and it was certainly worth the effort. I used Manchester Tan on the cabinets in our downstairs bathroom. It gets a lot of use and it has held up really well. I love the color. xo Diana

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  2. Yikes! When I do my kitchen, I'm planning to use the Rustoleum cabinet product so I can skip the sanding stage!! I'm also only going to do one section of the kitchen at a time. It'll probably take me all winter, but at least I won't go crazy!! lol Your kitchen looks fabulous!!

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  3. Kim, Congrats on your kitchen remodel. It looks AMAZING!!!! I love all your color choices, especially BM cabinet color. Thanks for sharing such a great post!!!!! I can't wait to see some more DIY projects!!!!!

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  4. wow, it sure is alot!!! of work, but it is soooo gorgeous!!! you should be super proud of yourself!!!!

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  5. I didn't do it that way because those kits are crazy expensive and I didn't like any of the color choices (to match my granite. Plus I would have needed 4 of them! The cost for the project would have been in the $400-500 range. This method cost me about $70 (paint, primer, sandpaper and wipes) If you want to skip the sanding and do it cheaply, you can use liquid sandpaper (which is the "secret" ingredient in those kits) plus save yourself a lot of money and actually choose your own paint color!

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  6. Thank you so much for the step-by-step. I need to get my supplies ready to go.

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  7. LOVE what you did!!...We are just in the beginning stages with new handles...I really want black, but since our cabinets are old, we can't find any new hinges that fit..When you said to spray paint them, I just grinned & knew I had to print your blog out for my husband to read...And your color choice I love!!...Thanks so much for sharing!!

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  8. This is a great breakdown of how to paint cabinets. You are a brave girl to tackle so many. You did a great job and the kitchen looks fantastic!

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  9. you did an awesome job! I'm a wuss...I paid someone to do it....was my big splurge.

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  10. I LOVE your kitchen project!!! You are my hero for doing all this, and the result is AMAZING! I am secretly making plans for our kitchen which involve major structural alteration work .... But I can't tell my husband yet, he would think I am totally out of my mind ...
    Jule

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  11. Can you come do mine? lo What an awesome tutorial! I would LOVE for you to stop over if you have time and link this up in The Mommy Club which fits in with the theme, mommy solutions! My linky opens at 9pm on Tue and runs through Mon. On Tue I feature the topped clicked links, too! I'd be honored if you joined in with this post or others from your blog!

    Thank you, Crystalhttp://www.crystalandcomp.com

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  12. I'm so glad you posted this! We want to paint our cabinets in the next 2 years or so and have been trying to compare as many different tutorials as we can. Yours is great because of the functionality of still using your kitchen!

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  13. Wow!!! You have me thinking ... maybe, just maybe, I could paint mine without losing my mind.

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  14. Love how this turned out. I have looked at many tutorials because I am planning on doing my own kitchen soon. I am interested how it looks close up. Does it look even and professional, or do you think a sprayer would be better? Did you place a top coat of poly or anything?

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  15. Great question Lisa!
    I had studied DOZENS of tutorials and I was convinced that the sprayer was going to be the way to go, but after I did my bathroom cabinets with the roller I knew as long as I was careful and did THIN layers it would look pretty darn good. I ended up with 4 coats on every surface, and the grain of the oak still shows through ever so slightly, so you can tell that the doors are real wood and not thermafoil. There aren't any brush strokes. Even my neighbor (who had his professionally sprayed) commented on how nice the finish was. I was CRAZY about making sure to not get any bubble or little hairs or globs. When you run you hand over the cabinets they are nice and smooth.

    I didn't use any poly on them (although I have used it on the cabinets in my bathroom and on the island that I stained) and that was only because I was IN LOVE with the finish ("Pearl" by Benjamin Moore.. which is only available in the Regal Ultra line) it was the perfect balance of a fine sheen over matte. I didn't want to ruin it with a layer of poly.

    I wish I could photograph the finish better.. it really is nice. I don't know if I could have been happier, even with a sprayer.

    Hope that helps!
    Kim

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  16. The hinges do eventually start to show wear, but I have used a sharpie to "touch up" where they rub when they open and close and that has worked great.

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  17. Looks awesome! Thanks for sharing the daily breakdown

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  18. Kim, can you come over and do my kitchen? I want it to be EXACTLY like yours... please!


    Thanks so much for sharing this at The DIY Dreamer.. From Dream To Reality!

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  19. Handyman Crafty WomanAugust 22, 2012 at 8:21 AM

    Such a nice upgrade! Thank you for posting on Handyman, Crafty Woman's Wicked Awesome Wednesday!

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  20. FABULOUS job! i just bought a "kitchen" and will be embarking on this adventure very soon. your process will make my job a lot easier!!! THANKS!

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  21. This is an absolutely amazing makeover! But the most amazing thing is that it only took you nine days!! I'm having flashbacks to the entire winter that it took to redo our kitchen. I hope you don't mind but I linked up your tutorial to the post I've got going up tomorrow.


    You truly are incredible!!!


    Lynn



    http://upcountryolio.blogspot.com/

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  22. Seriously amazing and the "not having a kitchen for ten days" is why I've been holding back painting ours. Just sent a link to my husband...we'll be doing this project this winter! Woot!

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  23. Great Job! Been there done that! But with primer and paint in one! I love your kitchen!!
    LBDH

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  24. What paint did you use for the hardware?

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  25. Amazing job!! Love all of the tips! Thanks so much for sharing your gorgeous kitchen at the Tuesday To Do Party!
    Smiles!
    Jami
    www.blackberryvine.blogspot.com

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  26. You mean the hinges right?
    The pulls/handles were already black (they didn't match the brass hinges.)

    For those I used spray paint plus primer in one. Krylon Dual in matte black. I have painted hinges on other cabinets before, and over time when the hinge opens and closes, right at the hinge point, the paint does wear off. I have touched them up with a black sharpie and that seems to last!

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  27. Looks great....but I wanted to reach through blog land and smack you for the comments about how many cabinets you have LOL! My "looks fancy and awesome" kitchen has so pitifully few cabinets, I could whip this project out in no time....but I have white now, so I think I'm going to wipe stain to give a french look.

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  28. You may have answered this already but what did you spray old hardware with before you hung the doors?

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  29. Since you didn't apply any poly at the end, how have your cabinets held up to dirt or splatter from any spills?

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  30. Started our renovation 5 days ago and can I say "WHAT A MESS!!" But I will give you absolute 'kudos' on the tip about the Clorox wipes. The best paint prep item EVER! We have scraped popcorn ceilings, textured and are now at the sanding part... This is going to take forever as we doing inside/outside of the cabinets and have lots also.
    But by following along with your blog, I see that there is light- and a beautiful kitchen and dining room- at the end of the tunnel.
    Thanks again for the great tips and inspiration :)

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  31. So far, so good. I have done cabinets in other parts of the house both ways (with and without poly) and I have to admit, I haven't seen a big difference. If you gouge it hard, it will scratch, no matter what, but the splatters of cooking, spaghetti sauce, plus the wear and tear of slamming doors and my kids knocking toys into them etc, haven't damaged them at all. The only other thing I have noticed, is that the poly has slightly yellowed on the cabinets in my laundry room, so in that sense, I am glad I didn't poly the kitchen ones.

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  32. I only sprayed the hinges. I used black matte since that is the finish on the knobs/pulls/handles. To paint the hinges, I wiped them clean, then I used spray paint with primer in one (or you could prime and then paint) The paint does wear off over tie where the hinge slides back and forth but I have touched them up with a black sharpie and you can barely tell.

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  33. Beautiful! Simply beautiful! How did you handle the crown molding at the top of the cabinets? Ours is faux wood so I'm not sure if it's sandable or if paint will stick to it. Thanks!

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  34. The molding on ours was real wood.. I just sanded it (by hand) and primed and painted it like the rest. Even if yours isn't real I would still try to rough it up with sandpaper and prime it just like regular wood. Since it has ZERO contact with anything, I wouldn't worry about the paint getting damaged.

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  35. This is absolutely the best tutorial I've seen on this subject. I'm in the psyching up process. I know it's going to be a lot of work and I need to be prepared. You have excellent taste. What color would you recommend for a kitchen with new white appliances? I love the Manchester tan but I think it would not look good with white.

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  36. Fabulous job! Are your cabinet boxes real wood? I am thinking about painting my cabinets but only my doors are real wood. What would you recommend I do so that the paint sticks? Thanks!

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  37. Did you have any problems with the drawers sticking? I painted a dresser and always have a hard time pulling out the drawers.

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  38. I only painted the drawer fronts.. not the interior of the drawers.
    I also added felt pads to the backside of the drawers (mostly to stop the noise from them banging closed) and that has helped them not stick. I do have a pull out cutting board that sticks a little bit, but so far, no problems with the drawers.

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  39. What color did you use for your kitchen walls?! I love it!!

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  40. It is Laura Ashley Gold 3 (by Veldspar: LA709) I actually didn't paint the walls.. it is the color the original owners used. It is a little gold for me, but with my new kitchen I don't mind it.

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  41. Kitchen Cabinets Manchester. www.solidwoodkitchen.co.uk .
    Kitchen Cabinets sale now on . £495 for complete kitchen with appliances.

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  42. You have inspired me to paint over the builders' grade honey oak in my home! I'm over it! Thank you for your tutorial. I am a single mom & I need my kitchen almost every second of the day, down-time is not an option for us!

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  43. I am so happy to have found this. Been wanting to do my kitchen cabinets but wasn't sure how! Now I know. Thank you so very much!

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  44. Do you mean that on top of the tan color you added a faux finish, Pearl? I did that in a small bathroom and used one of the finishing/sealing products on the Aqua Faux Effects website (these are all water soluable and non toxic). It doesn't change the look of what's underneath; I've used it in a number of places. So far, so good, but I don't have a whole army marching through the bathroom.

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  45. or totally drive you out of your mind before you even got to start!

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  46. The actual finish (like eggshell or semi-gloss) in that specific line of Benjamin Moore paint is called "Pearl" There is no special second step. It doesn't have anything over the top of the paint (like poly.) Hope that helps!

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  47. I have done this a couple of times. So now that im getting a new (to me) house I will be using the rustoleum kitchen cabinet paint kit. NO priming No sanding. Saves so many steps and time and has great finish. great job though!

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  48. LOVE IT!!! I, like many others am researching many blogs on the best way of painting cabinets. Since you have the same cabinets I do, May I ask this: Is it difficult to sand in the pattern or groove of the door fronts? How did you do that? Complete newbie here and details like that derail me from even starting. I know I need to start small with a powder room but same cupboards in there too. Thanks so much for your time and BLOG.

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  49. I did a little hand sanding (with both a small square of sandpaper and with a block) on the outside edges and where the panel is inset, nothing too major. A few swipes. I was careful to wipe them good with the sanitizing wipes to make sure there was no grease and grime on them before I painted.. since those areas tended to be really grungy.

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  50. Kitchen looks awesome! I couldn't tell, did you paint the insides of the cabinets and drawers or leave them oak?

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  51. Fabulous job! And you did it all. KUDOS! Wow! Just wow! I found your kitchen through a pin on Pinterest claiming this could be done without sanding and only using ESP. The pin led me to a blog that was obviously not yours. I did a google image search and found the right owner of the magnificent kitchen. This the offending blog: http://my-house-my-home.com/2013/02/11/to-paint-over-any-surface-without-sanding-use-a-product-called-esp-easy-surface-prep-available-at-hardware-and-paint-shops-wipe-on-wipe-off-and-paint-in-90-minutes-works-well-over-enamel-pai-2/

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  52. Do you remember what color wall paint you used?

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  53. Your kitchen is amazing. I love the way you organized your kitchen makeover. I don't have near as many cupboards or drawers. I will be painting my kitchen to brighten and freshen it up and I think the cupboards should be done too. Thanks so much for all the details. looking forward to my own kitchen makeover.
    Christine

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  54. Hi. I like your work. I have the exact same cabinets and I am also tired of their honey oakiness. I have black granite counters with flecks of grey and silver, so I am thinking of doing my cabinets over with either almost black or black stain, or perhaps black paint. I want to hide the tired scallopy edges of the cabinets and I thought black might do that. What do you think. Do you wish you'd gone for black? Or do you think I am crazy to think about black. (We have bone coloured tile). Maureen

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  55. Hey Maureen, Have you seen this post? http://www.thekimsixfix.com/2012/07/help-me-design-my-kitchen.html I really did consider going all dark (after I stained my center island dark and liked how it came out) but because my kitchen is "U" shaped and has very little natural light, I decided against it. You can see the renderings in that post. I think if it was more open I may have done it all dark. I have painted, and stained my oak dark (in my bathrooms and in the kitchen).. I like the way the stain looks better, but it is personal opinion. (Check out the "how to stain oak cabinets" tutorial on the left hand sidebar) Good luck.

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  56. I know I'm late commenting here, but I'm moving very soon and my new kitchen has brand new cabinets, but boring old wood color. I'm determined to start this project as soon as we move in so that I don't put it off. You mentioned liquid sandpaper in another comment. Does that work well? Also, I can't tell if you painted the inside of the cabinets. I really don't want to. Mainly because I have 7 children and just doing as much as that is going to be hard enough. Do you recommend painting the inside? Thank you for your time. I really love your blog!

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  57. I didn't paint the full interiors.. I have a photo of how I painted the shelf fronts in the cabinets in this post about my laundry room: http://www.thekimsixfix.com/2011/09/the-laundry-room-before-and-after.html (about halfway down.) I didn't want them painted, since the lighter color would get scratched and dinged up when sliding stuff in and out. As for the liquid sandpaper, I have never used it, but have heard mixed reviews. It is the "secret" to the cabinet transformations kits which people swear by, so it must work okay for some people! Good luck!

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  58. Great work! Very inspired that I can remodel out outdated home too! Thank you!!

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  59. What did you use to apply the paint?

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  60. A foam roller and high quality brush (to do the insets)

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  61. kim
    can I send you a picture of my old cabinets, to get advise on painting them. They they are a darker oak stain with two top to bottom grooves and three round (decorative ha ha) plugs/t on top and bottom.

    thanks Dean
    Please respond here or email me

    americanshortsale@gmail.com

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  62. Sure.. Send them to me: bloggeradmin@thekimsixfix.com

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  63. What happened to the Easy Surface Prep ...? Wipe on wipe off paint in 90 minutes no sanding???Here you go through all of it the sanding and all.

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  64. The range of materials, designs, finishes and accessories available is
    not as broad as entirely custom cabinets, but semicustom cabinets cost
    less while allowing more flexibility than stock cabinets.
    garage cabinets

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  65. Hey nice post man! Thanks for incredible info.paintings

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  66. What brand and color black is your island? So many blacks have a purple tint that I want to avoid.

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  67. It is ebony from Minwax. Here is the post on the before and afters with a few more shots of the color. It is definitely brown-black.. not blue-black: http://www.thekimsixfix.com/2012/07/my-new-kitchen-island-staining-oak.html

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  68. This blog site has really a huge collection of articles with impressive information.

    http://www.certaproloudoun.com/exterior-painters-leesburg-va/

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  69. I love it! I am thinking on remodeling our kitchen but the "budget" is tight, so your ideas are perfect! Love Love it! Thanks for sharing.

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  70. Hi did you know that a website called homeideamaker.com is using your before and after picture to feature a product called ESP?

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  71. Love this kitchen re-do! Can I ask what color you painted your island it looks so professional!

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  72. Your before pics look so much like my kitchen right now and I totally love the update. Thank you for sharing.

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  73. Exactly how much sanding is required? Do you need to strip the wood?


    Thanks-

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  74. You definitely don't need to get to bare wood.. You just want to take off any loose/peeling finish and get a slightly roughed up surface for the primer to adhere. One or two passes with a palm or orbital sander would be plenty!
    Hope that helps!

    Kim

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  75. Kim - Thanks so much for posting your tutorial. I took advice from your blog and someone else's to do my kitchen cabinets. I painted them white (used Valspar Signature). I started hanging the doors up today, and I'm a little concerned that maybe I need to use a poly or wax or something to seal the paint?? I've already got a few nicks here and there from something hitting them, like my door hinges that I spray painted. Those have left a lot of little black marks, so I've had to be extra careful about them touching as I'm doing the door installation. Help!!! I'm so afraid that they're not gonna last.

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  76. You have to be really careful when you rehang them (and for the first few days) because even though the paint is dry, it isn't really "cured" It will still be soft for a few days (espeically if you have done multiple coats.) Once the paint hardens, you shouldn't have much trouble with regular wear and tear on them. Mine are more than a year old now and I only have one "ding" on a cabinet door where I accidentally scraped a knife blade along it. The typical wear and tear isn't showing at at. The hinges have scraped up a little bit (where they open and close) and I have occassionally touched them up with a sharpie.

    So don't fret! It is early. Just make sure you are careful until they are completely dry! Then you should be good to go. (Disclaimer: I can only comment on my experience with Benjamin Moore's paint line..)

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  77. So it will take approximately a few days to "cure" and then it should be hardened enough to withstand some wear and tear?

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  78. Yep. But the amount of time it takes to be completely dry will depend on a lot of things.. Air Temp, Humidity, Paint Thickness, etc. You should be able to open and close them etc right away, but you can probably gouge them with something sharp for at least a few additional days.

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  79. Just wondering what you used to paint? Was it a roller or brush?

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  80. Both. A foam roller on the flat surfaces, and a high end brush on the grooves/edges.

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  81. Can you use liquid sandpaper instead of sanding? or does this create another step of sanding lightly anyway.

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  82. I am so glad I found this!! I've been reading about painting cabinets for weeks.I will be using your method! Though I want high gloss dark turquoise cabinets :). I will be painting the walls a very light gray. Silver backsplash and not sure on counters just yet.
    Thanks for the post, you rock and your kitchen is GORGEOUS

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  83. This blog post is really great; the standard stuff of the post is genuinely amazing.york furniture store

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  84. We are moving into a house where the previous owner painted their cabinets already, but it doesn't look as if they went through any kind of steps to remove the previous lacquer, to remove their layer of paint and the layer or lacquer should I follow your same steps? Thank you!

    ReplyDelete

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